BPA-substitute BPS linked to increase in aggressiveness of breast cancer
Endocrine Society | April 18, 2017

Bisphenol S (BPS), a substitute for the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in the plastic industry, shows the potential for increasing the aggressiveness of breast cancer through its behavior as an endocrine-disrupting chemical, a new study finds. The results, which tested BPS in human breast cancer cells, will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society’s 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.

BPS is found in polycarbonate hard plastics, currency bills and thermal paper receipts as well as many products touted to be free of BPA, a known endocrine-disrupting chemical suspected of having multiple possible health risks.

“Despite hopes for a safer alternative to BPA, studies have shown BPS to exhibit similar estrogen-mimicking behavior to BPA,” said the study’s principal investigator, Sumi Dinda, Ph.D., associate professor at Oakland University School of Health Sciences, Rochester, Mich.

He and his colleagues studied the effects of BPS on estrogen receptor-alpha and the BRCA1 gene. Most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, and, according to the National Cancer Institute, 55 to 65 percent of women who inherit a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 gene will develop breast cancer.

The ELP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Exposure to BPA Substitute, BPS, Multiplies Breast Cancer Cells

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  • Mary Agh

    less immunogenic variants may enhance the ability of a tumour to bypass
    the host’s immune system. This process is referred to as tumour
    immunoediting. Interesting point.