Overeating linked to epigenetic changes in fat cells, small study finds
Shrishti Ahuja| Medical News Bulletin | April 11, 2017

A study published by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition investigates the effect of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) consumption, along with overall effects of overfeeding, on DNA-methylation patterns in adipose tissue.

The study comprised of 31 subjects who maintained a base diet and physical activity level. Muffins that contained either palm oil, an SFA palmitic acid, or refined sunflower oil, a PUFA linoleic acid, were added to their regular diet. The dietary intervention was carried out until a 3% weight gain was noted.

Results indicated that the DNA-methylation of CpG sites changed following dietary intervention. Both types of fatty acids increased overall DNA-methylation in adipose tissue. Dietary intervention by SFA showcased altered gene expression while no significant alteration in gene expression was identified during dietary addition of PUFA. It was therefore concluded that overfeeding of both SFA and PUFA results in epigenetic changes in adipose tissue of humans. A correlation was also recognized between baseline DNA-methylation and weight increase due to overfeeding.

[Read the full study here.]

The ELP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: You Are What You Eat: Dietary Intervention on DNA-Methylation

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  • Mary Agh

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